Spirit Horse

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I don’t think there is a rational person in this country that wasn’t torn apart by what happened at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT. When this type of unspeakable horror takes place it leaves just about everyone feeling helpless, with a deep need to reach out and do something, anything, to show how much you care. But what can be done?

Greg Becker of Palm Beach, Florida, is one of those people who wanted to do something. He reached out to us to ask if we could name a wild horse after Jessica Rekos, a horse lover who died that day. “Jessica loved everything about horses,” her parents, Rich and Krista Rekos said in a statement. “She devoted her free time to watching horse movies, reading horse books, drawing horses, and writing stories about horses.” When she turned 10, they promised, she could have a horse of her own. For Christmas, she asked Santa for new cowgirl boots and hat.

Our staff knew just the filly and now “Jessica” runs wild and free on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. We hope that her family can find some small comfort in this knowledge.

Jessica Certificate

 

Until the Last Wild Horse is Gone

This has been a devastating year for the American wild horse. In the west, as if the cruel helicopter roundups , confinement of nearly forty seven thousand wild horses in government holding pens, and their sale to kill buyers for slaughter in Canada and Mexico is not horrific enough, other insidious ways to rid the land of wild horses and the advocates trying to save them are beginning to surface. For example:  http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/opinion/forum-coming-to-south-dakota-bring-your-own-drinking-water/article_4d2d4783-6635-5b18-8c0d-b07229e1dda8.html

In the east, advocates for the wild horses north of Corolla, NC have been working with federal legislators to pass the Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act. The Act mandates that the herd be managed at a range of 120 – 130 with never less than 110 and that mares from Shackleford Banks can be introduced periodically to address the Corolla’s dying gene pool. Similar legislation was passed in 1998 to protect the Shackleford horses that live on half the habitat available to the Corollas.

Presently, an expired management plan calls for a maximum herd size of 60 and United States Fish & Wildlife Service has refused to allow the number to change. Two thirds of the land available to the wild horses of Corolla is privately owned and the other one third is owned by USFWS. This year’s aerial count showed 121 horses on 7,544 acres with only 8 horses on USFWS land. The current herd size is 119.

The Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act, sponsored by Congressman Walter Jones (R), passed the United States House of Representatives unanimously, on February 6, 2012. It was introduced into the Senate by NC Senator Kay Hagan (D) and co-sponsored by NC Senator Richard Burr (R) in March and referred to the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee where it has remained ever since.

Time is running out for the bill (S 3448) and for the Corolla wild horses. It will not take helicopter roundups, sales to kill buyers, or poisoned water to kill them. Without the ability to be managed at a genetically and physically healthy level, nature – in the form of genetic collapse and physical abnormalities due to inbreeding – will do the trick within a few generations.  Once they are gone – they are gone forever.

You can help to save them. Please e mail Senator Barbara Boxer, Chairperson of the Environment and Public Works Committee: https://boxer.senate.gov/en/contact/policycomments.cfm  and Senator James Inhofe:  http://inhofe.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Contact.ContactForm . Tell them that you strongly support S 3448 and you want to see it passed before the end of this year.  Tell them that these horses have coexisted with all other wildlife for nearly 500 years and have had no unacceptable impact on the environment. The Shackleford horses have been managed at the same number as defined in S 3448 for 14 years, on half the land available to the Corollas, with no unacceptable impact.

Only the voting public can stop the eradication of wild horses from our country. Do it today.

Awesome Volunteers!

During their Thanksgiving break, this group decided to give thanks by giving back!  While planning their recent trip to Corolla, Jena and Anthony Mazzio, Jon, Erica, Cindy and Rocco Parise, and Gina and Valerie Philippi contacted the Corolla Wild Horse Fund for a volunteer project that would benefit the wild horses. As frequent visitors to the area, this group understands involvement in protecting the horses’ habitat is necessary for their continued survival.   They showed up in force on Friday, November 23 to tackle the day’s work.  Supplied with trash bags and gloves, they combed several miles of the four wheel drive beach for hours collecting an impressive pile of trash that would otherwise become a hazard to the wild horses, visitors and vehicles.  Our dedicated Corolla Ocean Rescue came through with a plan to pick up all the trash that was collected that same afternoon.  A huge thank you goes out to this awesome group of volunteers!  Way to go!

 

Marta – Adopted

Congratulations to Krysta Rutherford of Smithfield, VA. Krysta and her family have adopted Marta (now named Katalina). Katalina will be trained with the help of Steve Edwards, Mill Swamp Indian Horses.

Flicka – Adopted!

 

ADOPTED Summer of 2013!  Her new home and family are in Kentucky!  Flicka is a beautiful chestnut mare with a flaxen mane and tail. She was removed from the wild because her foal, Felix, was in need of veterinary care.

Flicka has begun her ground training as is extremely sweet and calm. She is learning to lead, lunge, and pick up her feet. Flicka is 12 hands tall and will be an excellent  horse for a child.

For more information on adopting Flicka please see our adoption application and contact the herd manager at 252.453.8002 or at herdmgr@corollawildhorses.com

 

Wild Horses and Waterfowl Habitats

URGENT: Read the letter filled with false claims sent by Ducks Unlimited that is negatively impacting the critical legislation to protect the Corolla wild horse herd as well as the response by our Executive Director. If you are a local hunter or come here to hunt, you know that the wild horses have no impact on the duck population – or the subaquatic vegetation. In fact, on September 13, 2012 as he and our Herd Manager conducted our aerial herd count (which is 119 not 140 as stated by Mr. Hall), the Currituck Wildlife Refuge Manager remarked that there was more subaquatic vegetation than he had seen in a long time. Please write, call, or email H. Dale Hall; Senators Hagan, Burr, Inhofe; Boxer; Warner and Webb and let them know, that as a hunter, or a member of Ducks Unlimited you are outraged by these false statements and ask these Senators to pass the Corolla Wild Horses Protection Act. Time is running out.

Ducks Unlimited Letter to the Committee on Environmental and Public Works

Corolla Wild Horse Fund Executive Director’s Response to Ducks Unlimited

Links:

Ducks Unlimited: http://www.ducks.org/about-du/contact-du-online

Environment and Public Works Committee, Barbara Boxer, Chair http://epw.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactUs.ContactForm

Senator Kay Hagan:  http://www.hagan.senate.gov/contact/

Senator Richard Burr: http://burr.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Contact.ContactForm

Senator Mark Warner: http://www.warner.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?p=Contact

Senator Jim Webb:  http://www.webb.senate.gov/contact.cfm

Firecracker – ADOPTED Spring 2015

On June 29, 2012, Firecracker was found with an infected umbilical cord. For fear that without treatment, and possibly surgery, he would become septic and possibly die, Firecracker and his mother were removed to receive veterinary care. After a thorough exam by the veterinary it became apparent that something was also terribly wrong with his mother.… Read More

Felix – Available for Adoption

Felix was removed with his mother, Flicka, on September 12, 2012 after he ingested fishing line and possibly a hook. He was examined by our veterinarian who did an endoscopy and carefully monitored him until he was out of danger.

Felix was born on May 25, 2012, he is a chestnut with a white star.… Read More

Maria – Adopted!

ADOPTED Fall of 2013!  Maria and Carlos were both adopted by the same family, and their new home is in Tennessee!  It is reported that Tennessee pasture grass might just taste better than dune grass!  Carlos was born in the wild and found abandoned in the summer of 2013.  At the CWHF rescue barn, Maria and Carlos bonded quickly.

Maria was rescued from the wild with a severely lame left hind hoof in September of 2012. Maria is now fully recovered and has begun her ground training. She is learning to lead, lunge, and pick up her feet.

Maria stands at 12.2 hands. She has a kind eye and sweet disposition.

 

Rico – Adopted Fall 2014!

Rico was removed on July 16, 2012 with a fractured coffin bone and loose bone fragment. Surgery to remove the fragment only has a 10% success rate and a 90% of permanently crippling him. Instead of surgery, Rico’s lower right front leg was put in a cast for several weeks, and his status was monitored closely.… Read More